World War 2 Events by Country - United States


Listing of all day-by-day events of the Second World War related to the nation of United States.

World War 2 spanned across language barriers, cultures, and borders as it wreaked havoc around the globe. The conflict was made up of several major theaters - spanning nearly all oceans and continents - which contained many individual campaigns and, within these, key battles and events on both the military and political spectrums. The war was fought with equal fervor and verocity across the land, on the sea (and under it), and in the air as millions of men and women answered the call of their respective flags - or happened to find themselves in the war's path with no option but to fight. In the end, the fractured world opened its eyes to a new order - one that would usher in a whole new trial in the Cold War and lead to the establishment of dozens of independent countries heading towards the end of the century.

There are a total of (461) World War 2 Events by Country - United States events in the SecondWorldWarHistory.com database. Entries are listed below by date-of-occurrence ascending (first-to-last). Other leading and trailing events may also be included for perspective.


Day-by-Day Timeline of Events


Tuesday, September 5th, 1939

The United States government declares its neutrality in the European conflict.

Wednesday, September 27th, 1939

The German battleships Deutschland and Graf Spee are let loose on Allied shipping convoys in the North Atlantic.

Sunday, October 1st, 1939

The Graf Spee goes on to sink four more Allied merchant vessels during the month of October.

Saturday, November 4th, 1939

The United States government revises its neutral stance and allows for sales of military goods to occur - the buyer responsible for payment and transport.

Saturday, December 2nd, 1939

The Finnish government seeks assistance from the League of Nations.

Thursday, December 14th, 1939

The Soviet Union is expelled from the League of Nations.

Friday, May 31st, 1940

The U.S. government commits millions to a new defense program aimed at modernizing and strengthening the current force.

Thursday, June 13th, 1940

War goods begin leaving U.S. shores bound for Britain.

Thursday, June 13th, 1940

U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt signs a $1.3 billion dollar commitment to modernize the United States Navy fleet in preparation for possible war.

Thursday, June 20th, 1940

Republican Henry Stimson is appointed Secretary for War by President Roosevelt.

Thursday, June 20th, 1940

Republican Frank Knox is appointed Secretary for the Navy by President Roosevelt.

Thursday, July 25th, 1940

In an effort to disrupt the Japanese war economy, the U.S. government enacts a restrictive licensing program for its export of important steel and oil products.



Monday, September 2nd, 1940

The British and American governments agree to a deal for the British to receive some 50 old USN destroyers.

Tuesday, November 5th, 1940

Franklin Roosevelt is reelected to a third term as President of the United States.

Sunday, December 29th, 1940

Roosevelt's Fireside Chat radio program attempts to strengthen American support for the war against the Axis through supporting the British effort.

Thursday, January 2nd, 1941

The U.S. government commits to construction of some 200 merchant ships to support the Allied cause in the Atlantic.

Wednesday, January 29th, 1941

High level talks between the British and the Americans results in strengthening ties for the nations in the event of an American declaration of war with Germany.

Saturday, February 1st, 1941

The United States Navy reorganizes into three independent fleets to cover possible battlefronts in the Atlantic, Pacific, and the Asia-Pacific regions.

Tuesday, March 11th, 1941

President Roosevelt signs the Lend-Lease Act into law allowing the United States government to militarily support - with delayed payments - any and all allies when U.S. interests are threatened.

Sunday, March 30th, 1941

United States vessels capture some sixty-five ships aligned with the Axis powers.

Thursday, April 10th, 1941

The first US combat action against Germany occurs - this being the USS Niblack destroyer firing on a marauding German U-boat violating the US security zone.

Wednesday, November 26th, 1941

The Japanese naval fleet leaves home port and heads to Hawaii.

Saturday, December 6th, 1941

American President Franklin Roosevelt sends a final peace appeal to the Empire of Japan to which there is no answer.

Saturday, December 6th, 1941

American codebreakers begin tracking down a multi-part message - made up of 14 total components. Only the first 13 are actually deciphered, each being passed on to the President and the Secretary of State.



Saturday, December 6th, 1941

An attack against America is now deemed imminent though the consensus being that it will occur against interests somewhere in Southeast Asia.

Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At 9AM, the final Japanese message is broken down. It essentially directs its Washington envoy to break off diplomatic relations with America.

Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At approximately 10AM, a follow-up message is intercepted - meant for the Japanese diplomats in Washington - to delay handling of the previous message to the Americans until 1PM. The Americans now understand that an attack is imminent and the target is the US Naval fleet at Pearl Harbor.

Sunday, December 7th, 1941

It is discovered that communication lines from Washington to Hawaii are down for the moment, forcing the US War Department to use a commercial telegraph service to warn forces on the Hawaiian Islands.

Sunday, December 7th, 1941

The Imperial Japanese Navy attack commences with their assault. The force is made up of 423 aircraft and converges on the Hawaiian Islands.

Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At 6:00AM, the first wave of 183 Japanese Navy aircraft takes off from their carriers, just north of Oahu, to make the 230 mile trek. The target is the US Pacific Fleet.

Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At 7:02AM, the Japanese attack wave is located on American radar by two US Army personnel who bring it to the attention of a junior officer. The officer, expecting a flight of Boeing B-17 Flying Fortresses to arrive that day, disregards the alert.

Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At approximately 7:15AM, the second wave of 167 Japanese Navy planes takes off from their carriers towards Pearl.

Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At 7:53AM, complete surprise by the Japanese Navy and the first wave begins their initial strike. This force is made up of 50 medium bombers, 43 A6M Zero fighters and 40 Kate torpedo bombers. Targets are the battleships hunkered down in the harbor and airfields used by the USAAF.

Sunday, December 7th, 1941

The second wave of Japanese Navy aircraft swoops in attacking targets of opportunity including auxiliary ships in the harbor and the all-important harbor facilities.

Sunday, December 7th, 1941

The attack on Pearl Harbor is over at 9:45AM. Over 2,400 people are killed and a further 1,178 are wounded. More die in the ensuing days while 1,104 sailors eventually perish within the hull of the battleship USS Arizona, its magazine stores ignited by a single Japanese bomb.

Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At 2:30PM Eastern Time, the Japanese diplomats in Washington finally visit with US Secretary of State Cordell Hull.



Sunday, December 7th, 1941

In conjunction with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Wake Island is assaulted by a Japanese invasion force all its own - this under the command of Rear-Admiral Kajioka Sadamichi.

Monday, December 8th, 1941

The United States, along with Britain, formally declare war on the Empire of Japan.

Wednesday, December 10th, 1941

Along the north of Luzon - at Aparri, Gonzago and Vigan - two large Japanese Army forces land via amphibious assault.

Thursday, December 11th, 1941

As expected, Germany and Italy side with Japan and officially declare war on the United States

Friday, December 12th, 1941

The airfields at Laoang and Tuguegarao fall to the Japanese invaders.

Monday, December 22nd, 1941

The Japanese 48th Division lands at Lingayen Bay on Luzon.

Tuesday, December 23rd, 1941

The order is given by American General Douglas MacArthur to retreat from Luzon and take up positions on the Bataan Peninsula.

Tuesday, December 23rd, 1941

MacArthur's forces are cut-off from further retreat by a Japanese Army force advancing from the south.

Tuesday, December 23rd, 1941

Despite an out-numbered yet heroic resistance on the part of American forces, Wake Island falls to the Japanese.

Tuesday, December 23rd, 1941

The American military detachment at Wake Island surrenders. During their stand, the Americans accounted for at least 1,000 Japanese casualties and 4 Japanese navy warships.

Thursday, December 25th, 1941

The Japanese 48th Division makes substantial progress against American forces, working their way towards the capital city of Manila.

Saturday, December 27th, 1941

The Philippine capital city of Manila eventually falls to the invading Japanese Army.



Monday, December 14th, 1942

Allied Australian and US forces continued their maches against the Japanese, taking territory through fierce firefights.

Saturday, August 8th, 1942

A large contingent of Imperial Japanese Navy warships heads out of Rabaul towards Savo Island to strike at US Navy transports there.

Sunday, August 9th, 1942

Three US and one Australian cruiser are sunk by the Japanese Navy during the morning hours.

Sunday, August 23rd, 1942

The Imperial Japanese Navy enacts a plan to resupply their forces at Guadalcanal under the cover of three aircraft carriers made up of the IJN Ryujo, the IJN Shokaku and the IJN Zuikaku.

Sunday, August 23rd, 1942

US naval patrol aircraft spot the incoming Japanese convoy, radioing positions back to the main task force.

Monday, August 24th, 1942

US naval patrol aircraft once again spot the incoming Japanese convoy. Positions are sent to Task Force 61.

Monday, August 24th, 1942

Task Force 61, comprised of the USS Enterprise, USS Saratoga and the USS Wasp head to intercept the Japanese convoy.

Monday, August 24th, 1942

Task Force 61 sets up at locations east of Malaita Island in preparation for the battle. Aircraft are launched form the American carriers beginning what is known as the Battle of the Eastern Solomons.

Monday, August 24th, 1942

At 3:15PM, American carrier aircaft from the USS Enterprise manage hits on the IJN Shokaku.

Monday, August 24th, 1942

Dive bombers and torpedo bombers from the USS Enterprise manage critical hits against the IJN Ryujo and sink here where she stood at 3:50PM.

Monday, August 24th, 1942

At about 4:41PM, the USS Enterprise is the victim of Japanese dive bombers and takes several direct hits but manages to keep fighting.

Monday, August 24th, 1942

The Japanese Navy lose their seaplane carrier - the IJN Chitose - to American dive bombers at 5:40PM.



Tuesday, August 25th, 1942

The Japanese Navy loses a pair of transport ships enroute to the Solomon Island chain.

Tuesday, August 25th, 1942

The Battle of the Eastern Solomons ends with the Japanese Navy claiming at least 90 aircraft lost while the American Navy enjoys victory with 20 aircraft lost in the fray.

Sunday, October 11th, 1942

A Japanese Navy convoy headed through the Eastern and Western Solomons is intercepted by a US Navy force, beginning what is known as the Battle of Cape Esperance.

Sunday, October 11th, 1942

At 11:32PM, US Navy warships fire upon IJN vessels in the convoy, sinking the IJN Fubuki and damaging the IJN Furutaka and IJN Aoba, which themselves begin sinking.

Sunday, October 11th, 1942

At midnight, the Japanese convoy is in retreat and gone from the region in roughly 30 minutes.

Sunday, October 11th, 1942

The IJN Furutaka officially sinks at 12:40AM.

Sunday, October 25th, 1942

Japanese Navy supply ships make their way offshore of Guadalcanal where land forces there are attempting to take Henderson Field.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

A USN Consolidated PBY Catalina flying boat scout plane spots the Japanese waterforce and relays their position.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

The US Navy sends Task Force 16 and 17 to intercept the Japanese resupply action.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

US Navy aircraft are launched from USS Enterprise and USS Hornet but fail to locate the Japanese ships.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

A PBY Catalina, capable of limited bombing, misses its mark as it attempts to hit several Japanese aircraft carriers at 2:50AM.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

USS Enterprise launches a wave of Dauntless dive bombers in search of the Japanese group. Some 22 total aircraft are launched.



Monday, October 26th, 1942

72 aircraft are launched as a combined force from USS Enterprise and USS Hornet.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

The IJN carrier launch around 110 aircraft in response.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

At 7:40AM, USN dive bombers damage the IJN carrier Zuiho.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

US Navy and IJN aircraft formally meet in air to air combat by 8:15AM.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

The USS Hornet takes a critical hit at 9:15AM from attacking Japanese Navy dive bombers and torpedo bombers. The IJN forces claim two torpedo hits and a further six bomb hits against her.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

The crew of the USS Hornet begin evacuation procedures aboard their doomed ship.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

The crippled IJN carrier Zuiho is hit by another four bombs, bringing her tenure at sea to an official close at 9:18AM.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

USN bombers score several key direct hits against the carrier IJN Shokaku at 9:30AM.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

USS Enterprise receives several direct hits from IJN dive bombers against her flight deck and forward elevator.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

The Americans signal a withdrawal of all forces form the battle.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

The USS Hornet is cleared of all crew by 11:40AM.

Tuesday, October 27th, 1942

Destroyers of the IJN come across the remains of the USS Hornet and launch torpedoes against her, sending her to the bottom of the Pacific.



Wednesday, July 22nd, 1942

The Japanese Army gain ground on the US, Australian and Papuan Infantry Regiment defenders.

Friday, August 14th, 1942

The Japanese Army gains vital territory leading up and into the Owen Stanley Range.

Friday, August 14th, 1942

The Japanese Army takes control of the village of Kokoda.

Friday, August 14th, 1942

The Japanese Army reaches Isurava just outside of Port Moresby.

Sunday, August 30th, 1942

American General Douglas MacArthur employs his superiors for additional firepower and troop strength to help hold Papua.

Thursday, October 15th, 1942

American soldiers of the 32nd US Division complete an amphibious assault near Pongani and Wanigela on Papua.

Sunday, November 15th, 1942

US forces continue their march from the south against Japanese-held areas.

Thursday, January 1st - March 1st, 1942

Off the east coast of the United States, some 216 vessels fall prey to the German U-boat scourge in this span.

Friday, January 9th, 1942

The Japanese begin their offensive against the dug-in American forces on the Bataan Peninsula.

Friday, January 23rd, 1942

The American defensive lines finally break.

Thursday, April 9th, 1942

American forces fighting on the Bataan Peninsula finally surrender to the Japanese.

Sunday, May 3rd, 1942

Forces of the Imperial Japanese Army land at Tulagi of the Solomons island group. Subsequent develop ensures a base of operations for Japanese logistics in the region.



Sunday, May 3rd, 1942

An Imperial Japanese Navy carrier force sets sail on patrol around the Solomons looking for American carrier battle groups.

Sunday, May 3rd, 1942

American intelligence intercepts various Japanese communications and is able to piece together the intention to invade Port Moresby, New Guinea.

Monday, May 4th, 1942

USS Yorktown launched strike aircraft south of Guadalcanal. At 6:30AM, the American Navy aircraft spot and subsequently target Japanese land emplacements and sea vessels in the area.

Monday, May 4th, 1942

The Japanese invasion force leaves Rabaul, New Britain, heading towards Port Moresby, New Guinea.

Tuesday, May 5th, 1942

The Japanese enact an offensive to take Corregidor Island, a strategic point providing access to Manila Bay.

Wednesday, May 5th - May 6th, 1942

Foul weather limits detection of either carrier force across a two day span.

Wednesday, May 6th, 1942

Corregidor Island falls to the Japanese, giving the invaders control over Manila Bay.

Thursday, May 7th, 1942

Allied Task Force 44, headed by Royal Navy Rear-Admiral Crace, moves in to intercept the Japanese invasion force. However, the force is prematurely spotted by Japanese reconnaissance aircraft resulting in a counter-assault of the Task Force by Japanese Navy warplanes. Crace and his force never make the intercept.

Thursday, May 7th, 1942

The USS Neosho and the USS Sims are sunk by Japanese aircraft.

Thursday, May 7th, 1942

The Allies spot the Japanese Covering Group escorting the invasion force.

Thursday, May 7th, 1942

The USS Lexington and the USS Yorktown launch their attack planes and sink the Japanese aircraft carrier Shoho in the process.

Friday, May 8th, 1942

Some 27 Japanese aircraft are launched under the cover of darkness in the hopes of locating the Allied Task Force. They come up empty and only six aircraft return safely home.



Friday, May 8th, 1942

Just past dawn, the Japanese and American carrier groups spot one another.

Friday, May 8th, 1942

At 9:25AM, Japanese and American warplanes take to the skies.

Friday, May 8th, 1942

At 11:40AM, US Navy warplanes manage to score devastating hits to the Japanese aircraft carrier Shokaku, severely damaging her.

Friday, May 8th, 1942

At 2:47PM, the American carrier USS Lexington is hit by a Japanese torpedo, causing a major explosion in her generator room.

Friday, May 8th, 1942

By 6:00PM that evening, nearly all of the USS Lexington's sailors have been rescued.

Friday, May 8th, 1942

At 6:10PM, the USS Lexington is a complete loss. She is scuttled and sunk.

Saturday, May 9th, 1942

The Japanese aircraft do not locate the American fleet and any further actions are called off, effectively ending the Battle of Coral Sea.

Thursday, May 14th, 1942

The convoy system is formally adopted by the United States in an effort to protect its merchant shipping in the Atlantic.

Wednesday, May 20th, 1942

The 2nd Canadian Infantry Division begins training for Operation Rutter on the Isle of Wight.

Monday, May 25th, 1942

A large Imperial Japanese Naval force sails for Japan towards Midway Island. The force Is made up of four task forces. One is charged with the invasion of the Aleutian Islands off of Alaska while the other three are to take Midway Island itself and assail the responding USN fleet. One group contains the required four aircraft carriers.

Thursday, May 28th, 1942

The final Imperial Japanese Task Force leaves mainland Japan.

Monday, June 1st - June 30th, 1942

June of 1942 marks the single worst month of Allied shipping losses, totaling some 834,000 tons of goods at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.



Wednesday, June 3rd, 1942

The Northern Task Force begins its operation to take the Aleutian Island chain and divert USN forces to the region.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 4:30AM, the bombing of Midway Island begins with aircraft from Vice-Admiral Nagumo's First Carrier Strike Force.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

American fighter aircraft take heavy losses but force the Japanese Navy to launch a second attack.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 7:28AM, a Japanese reconniassance plane spots spots ten undetermined USN surface ships 200 miles northeast of the Japanese Midway invasion force.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 7:52AM, USS Enterprise and USS Hornet launch their dive bombers and torpedo planes.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 8:20AM, a surprised Nagumo receives his first report of American carriers in the area.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 8:37AM, aircraft of the second Japanese strike force returns to their respective carriers for rearming and refueling.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 9:00AM, USS Yorktown launches her aircraft with Nagumo's carrier force as the prime target.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

Between 9:30AM and 10:00AM, Torpedo planes from the USS Enterprise and USS Hornet begin their attacks on the Japanese carriers.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 9:18AM, Nagumo reacts to the American presence and changes the course of his Carrier Strike Force.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

The first wave of USN carrier dive-bombers has difficulty in locating their Japanese targets.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

All incoming USN Devastator attackers are shot down by Japanese Zero fighters in the span of six minutes.



Thursday, June 4th, 1942

The initial American assault on the Japanese carrier strike force is over by 10:00AM.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 10:25AM, a follow-up strike made up of 37 Dauntless dive bombers finds the Japanese carriers - now stocked with armed and fueled aircraft on their decks.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

The three Japanese carriers - Kaga, Soryu and Akagi - are struck with bombs and ultimately sunk.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 12:00PM, Imperial Japanese Navy bomber aircraft strike against the attacking USS Yorktown.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

By 2:30PM, the USS Yorktown is severely damaged but does not sink.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

By 3:00PM, the crew of the USS Yorktown has abandoned their carrier. The damaged vessel is towed by USN ships.

Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 5:00PM, the Imperial Japanese aircraft carrier Hiryu is set ablaze after being struck by no fewer than five direct bomb hits from aircraft of the USS Enterprise.

Friday, June 5th, 1942

The Japanese carrier Hiryu is scuttled.

Saturday, June 6th, 1942

The USS Yorktown, now severely damaged and in tow of US Navy forces, is targeted and sunk by a Japanese submarine.

Saturday, June 6th, 1942

The island of Kiska is taken by Japanese forces.

Sunday, June 7th, 1942

The island of Attu is taken by Japanese forces.

Wednesday, July 1st - July 31st, 1942

The Allies received word on the construction of a strategic Japanese airfield (Henderson Field) on the island of Guadalcanal, part of the Solomon Islands. As such, plans are set in motion to curtail construction of the endeavor. US Navy and Marine forces spring into action.



Tuesday, July 7th, 1942

This date is set aside for Operation Rutter - the amphibious landing at the port city of Dieppe in occupied France.

Tuesday, July 7th, 1942

Bad weather cancels this original date for Operation Rutter. Discussions begin on whether or not to nix the entire endeavor. It returns to the planning stages under a new name - Operation Jubilee.

Sunday, July 19th, 1942

German U-boats off the eastern coast of the US are relocated to better assault the merchant fleets streaming across the Atlantic.

Thursday, August 6th, 1942

US Navy and Marine forces position themselves near Guadalcanal.

Friday, August 7th, 1942

Amphibious forces spearheaded by the United States Marines begin against the Japanese-held island of Guadalcanal.

Saturday, August 8th, 1942

The amphibious landings largely conclude by this date.

Saturday, August 8th, 1942

By the end of the day and facing next to no opposition, the US soldiers capture and secure Henderson Field.

Saturday, August 8th, 1942

Naval battles ultimately take place between the Imperial Japanese Navy and the United States Navy for control of Guadalcanal.

Saturday, August 8th, 1942

Japanese bombers attack US forces at Henderson Field.

Saturday, August 8th, 1942

Just outside of Guadalcanal, the islands of Tulagi and Gavutu fall to the Allies.

Tuesday, August 18th, 1942

A Japanese counteroffensive sees an amphibious landing take place at Taivu. This landing zone is just 32 miles east of Henderson Field.

Wednesday, August 19th, 1942

This date is targeted for Operation Jubilee.



Wednesday, August 19th, 1942

Operation Jubilee is officially put into action.

Wednesday, August 19th, 1942

4,962 Canadian soldiers, along with 1,000 British troops and a 50-man contingent of American US Army Rangers set sail on no fewer than 237 boats towards Dieppe.

Wednesday, August 19th, 1942

At 3:48 AM, several Allied invasion vessels run into a German convoy, which actively engages the ships, ruining any chance the Allies held in the element of surprise. This event is a fore-telling of the day to follow.

Wednesday, August 19th, 1942

At 5:35 AM, Allied armor makes it to the beach. Over half of the tanks are lost in the action.

Wednesday, August 19th, 1942

By 11:00 AM, disaster has completely befallen the invaders. Many are trapped, forced back or dead to a prepared German defense.

Wednesday, August 19th, 1942

By 2:00 PM, all survivors of the Dieppe invasion have been rescued. Left behind are 3,367 casualties, wounded, prisoners of war or missing.

Thursday, August 20th, 1942

The first of thirty-one US fighter aircraft arrive at Henderson Field.

Friday, August 21st, 1942

Nazi-allied French leader Marshal Petain celebrates the German victory over the Allied invasion at Dieppe.

Friday, August 21st, 1942

Japanese ground forces attempt attacks against Henderson Field and American forces at Tenaru. The Japanese troops make little headway and are themselves encircled.

Saturday, August 22nd, 1942

The Japanese attackers at Henderson Field and Tenaru are ultimately destroyed, forcing Colonel Ichiki to commit ritual suicide.

Sunday, August 23rd, 1942

The Battle of the Eastern Solomons begins.

Monday, August 24th, 1942

The US Navy claims a Japanese aircraft carrier. The carrier is attacked and sunk.



Monday, August 31st, 1942

By this date, the Japanese have completed their takeovers of the Caroline Islands, the Gilbert Islands, the Marshall Islands, the Marianas Islands and a portion of the Solomon Islands. This is the farthest that the Japanese Empire would reach in the Pacific.

Tuesday, September 1st - September 30th, 1942

The month is spent ironing out plans for the Allied invasion of German-occupied North Africa.

Monday, September 7th, 1942

US Marines enact a surprise amphibious landing against Japanese strongholds at Taivu.

Tuesday, September 8th, 1942

The US Marine landings result in the destruction of vital Japanese supplies and the recovery of important operational data.

Saturday, September 12th, 1942

Some 6,000 Japanese Army personnel are used in a final thrust against the Americans at Henderson field. Among the attackers is the Japanese 35th Brigade.

Sunday, September 13th, 1942

Japanese forces come within a half-a-mile of Henderson Field before being stopped and, ultimately, driven back.

Monday, September 14th, 1942

At the end of the Henderson Field offensive, the fanatical Japanese have lost at least 1,200 soldiers in the fighting.

Tuesday, September 15th - October 7th, 1942

The Japanese begin building up their forces to reclaim Henderson Field.

Saturday, October 10th, 1942

Japanese reinforcements are shipped to the west and disembarked at Tenaro, some 20 miles from American forces.

Friday, October 23rd, 1942

Some 20,000 Japanese fighters, including elements of the 2nd Division and 17th Army, undertake a new offensive under the direction of General Maruyama.

Monday, October 26th, 1942

After some 3,500 casualties are netted against the Japanese attackers, the offensive stalls and is ultimately called off.

Sunday, November 1st - January 31st, 1942

Neither force can claim much action during this span. In time, US forces number some 58,000 troops while Japan can claim 20,000-strong.



Saturday, November 7th, 1942

Three Allied task forces - the US Western, Central and the British Eastern - approach the coast of North Africa.

Sunday, November 8th, 1942

The Allied invasion forces reach North African shores.

Monday, November 9th, 1942

The first French cease-fires begin to ring out across Algeria and Morocco.

Monday, November 9th, 1942

US forces tangle with a suprisingly stout French defense. It was believed that the two country's histories would have brought France to surrender rather than fight a former ally.

Sunday, November 15th, 1942

American paratroopers land at the airfield near Youks les Bains

Monday, November 16th, 1942

Allied forces begin their move into German-held Tunisia.

Tuesday, November 17th, 1942

The Allies capture Beja.

Wednesday, November 18th, 1942

The Allies take Sidi Nsir.

Friday, November 20th, 1942

The Allied assault on the strategic city of Medjez el Bab begins.

Thursday, November 26th, 1942

Medjez el Bab falls to the Allies.

Monday, November 30th, 1942

Despite the consistent progression throughout North Africa, the Allied invasion offensive grounds to a halt in the face of growing German resistance at key junctions. The total liberation of North Africa will have to wait.

Sunday, January 3rd, 1943

American forces lay claim to Buna.



Sunday, January 31st, 1943

Sananada is officially in Allied hands.

Sunday, January 31st, 1943

The Kokoda Trail is firmly in Allied hands by this date.

Wednesday, November 10th, 1943

The combined force of US Army and Marine Corps troops numbering 35,000 personnel heads towards Betio on the Tarawa Atoll.

Saturday, November 13th, 1943

US Navy warplanes and warships begin the bombardment of Japanese positions at Makin and Tarawa in preparation for the planned amphibious assaults.

Saturday, November 20th, 1943

US Navy warplanes and warships conclude their bombardment of Japanese positions.

Saturday, November 20th, 1943

At 9:10AM, the first US Marine soldiers make it ashore at Betio during the initial amphibious landings. Nearly half are cut down in low waters by the waiting Japanese defenders.

Saturday, November 20th, 1943

US tanks and armored vehicles finally make it ashore and strengthen the US Marine presence on the beaches.

Saturday, November 20th, 1943

By the end of the first day of operations, some three US Marine battalions have made it onto the beaches.

Sunday, November 21st, 1943

Another US amphibious landing, this consisting of both Army and Marine elements, makes it to the shores on Makin.

Sunday, November 21st, 1943

US forces at Makin kill some 800 defending Japanese soldiers, leaving just a lone survivor.

Sunday, November 21st, 1943

US forces officially take Makin and give the "Makin Taken" signal.

Sunday, November 21st, 1943

US forces take Apamama after the suicide of its 22-strong Japanese garrison.



Sunday, November 21st, 1943

US forces continue their progress against the Gilberts though a dogged Japanese resistance makes for slow progress.

Monday, November 22nd, 1943

By 8PM on this date, US forces lay claim to portions of the Gilberts at its east and central regions.

Monday, November 22nd, 1943

By night time hours, the Japanese enact a counter-attack against US forces, hoping to regain lost ground and take their invaders by surprise.

Tuesday, November 23rd, 1943

The Japanese assault is repelled with a tremendous loss of life for the IJA. The dead number some 500 personnel in hours of fighting.

Tuesday, November 23rd, 1943

The final Japanese defenders at Betio capitulate.

Tuesday, November 23rd, 1943

With the fall of Betio, the Gilbert Islands are now under control of US forces.

Sunday, January 10th, 1943

The decision to abandon Guadalcanal is made by Japanese autorities.

Sunday, January 17th, 1943

The Japanese begin to withdraw their battered army units from Guadalcanal.

Monday, February 1st, 1943

A massive evacuation effort sees some 11,000 Japanese personnel moved fom Tenaro, Gaudalcanal.

Monday, February 1st, 1943

A Presidential directive calls for some 250 American aircraft to begin offensive actions in the Atlantic.

Sunday, February 7th, 1943

Gaudalcanal officially falls to the Americans.

Sunday, February 7th, 1943

The last remnants of the Japanese Army on Guadalcanal is evacuated from the island.



Sunday, February 14th, 1943

At 4AM, elements of the 10th Panzer Division and 21st Panzer Division under General von Arnim, launch their attack at Allied forces near Sidi Bou Zid and Bir el Hafey.

Monday, February 15th, 1943

German General Erwin Rommel commences with his assault through Operation Morgenluft. His attack takes him towards Gafsa, Feriana and Thelepte.

Thursday, February 18th, 1943

General von Arnim and General Rommels forces finally meet at Kasserine.

Friday, February 19th, 1943

American armored forces hold up the German advanced at Kasserine Pass.

Saturday, February 20th, 1943

The Americans fold under the immense German assault and Kasserine Pass falls to the invaders.

Saturday, February 20th, 1943

Allied units move from Le Kef for the counter-attack.

Saturday, February 20th, 1943

The British 6th Armored Brigade moves towards Thala and Sbiba.

Saturday, February 20th, 1943

US forces move in to stop the German advance around Tebessa.

Sunday, February 21st, 1943

The German forces at Kasserine Pass under Rommel await the Allied counter-offensive that never materializes.

Monday, February 22nd, 1943

Allied forces hold the Germans in check at Sbiba, Tebessa and Thala, inflicting 2,000 German casualties and forcing Rommel to call for a retreat.

Thursday, February 25th, 1943

Kasserine is now firmly in Allied control, the Germans having retreated and Rommel's attention now elsewhere.

Saturday, May 1st - May 31st, 1943

By the end of May, 43 U-boats are sunk to just 34 merchant vessels.



Saturday, May 1st, 1943

Allied aircraft are fitted with U-boat detecting radar systems.

Wednesday, May 19th, 1943

Some 33 U-boats assail an Allied convoy. However, the streamlined Allied response nets zero ship losses and fatalities. The U-boats come up empty.

Tuesday, June 1st - June 30th, 1943

British and American authorities work together to formulate the Pointblank Directive - a combined air bombing campaign against the air production facilities of the German Luftwaffe.

Sunday, June 6th, 1943

The Allied D-Day landings in the North of France eventually render the French-German U-boat bases inoperable.

Friday, July 9th, 1943

The Allied invasion fleets sail out to Sicily.

Saturday, July 10th, 1943

Operation Husky begins. Target - German-held Sicily. Some 2,590 naval vessels take part in the invasion which encompasses two army groups of American and British forces invading at two different coasts of the island.

Saturday, July 10th, 1943

US 82nd Airborne Division and British 1st Airborne Division paratroopers land at strategic locations across Sicily prior to the invasion force's arrival.

Saturday, July 10th, 1943

15th Army Group begins their initial assault to the south.

Sunday, July 11th, 1943

The Hermann Goring Panzer Division engages the US 1st Infantry Division at Gela. US forces are assited by offshore bombardment from Royal Navy ships and repel the German attack.

Tuesday, July 13th, 1943

Allied airborne elements parachute into Sicily and capture key bridges. However, a German counter-attack drives back any gains of the day.

Tuesday, July 13th, 1943

By this date, some 478,000 Allied troops have landed on Sicily.

Wednesday, July 14th, 1943

German Paratroopers repel Allied forces from the Primasole bridge.



Wednesday, July 14th, 1943

British and American forces finally meet at Comiso and Ragusa.

Wednesday, July 14th, 1943

The Allies control key airfields across the island, allowing air support more resources from which to work with.

Saturday, July 17th, 1943

The Primsole bridge is recaptured from the Germans.

Thursday, July 22nd, 1943

US General George C. Patton and his fabled 7th Army move along the west of the island at speed, claiming the Sicilian capital of Palermo in the process.

Sunday, July 25th, 1943

With Mussolini deposed back in Rome, Hitler has few options but to plan a retreat for his overwhelmed forces in Sicily. As such, he orders an official withdrawel.

Sunday, August 8th, 1943

In an attempt to cut off the retreating Germans, the US 7th Army conducts a flanking amphibious attack.

Wednesday, August 11th, 1943

The US 7th Army undertakes another amphibious jump to head off the German retreat.

Sunday, August 15th, 1943

One last amphibious assault by the 7th Army is conducted. The Germans now in full retreat to the northern tip of Sicily.

Sunday, August 15th, 1943

The Aleutian Islands Campaign comes to a close. The Japanese invasion is ultimately repelled.

Tuesday, August 17th, 1943

With only limited-range Allied fighter escorts, the first major air raid on Schweinfurt and Regensburg is launched. The air raid consists of 230 aircraft from the 1st Bombardment Wing and 146 aircraft of the 4th Bombardment Wing.

Tuesday, August 17th, 1943

Bad weather delays the original 5:30AM launch time of the operation.

Tuesday, August 17th, 1943

Aircraft of the 4th Bombardment Wing take-off at 6:20AM in an effort to reach its target in daylight.



Tuesday, August 17th, 1943

German Luftwaffe defense fighters attack the 4th Bombardment Wing formations passing over Germany.

Tuesday, August 17th, 1943

At 11:18AM, the 1st Bombardment Wing finally takes off.

Tuesday, August 17th, 1943

Some 250 German fighters, already alerted to the bomber group presence, are launched to repel subsequent air attacks.

Tuesday, August 17th, 1943

Sometime between 11:46AM and 12:09M, the 4th Bomber Group makes their bombing run on targets at Regensburg.

Tuesday, August 17th, 1943

At approximately 3:00PM, the 1st Bomber Group finally reaches its targets after incurring heavy losses from German fighters. Their bombing run ensues over Schweinfurt.

Tuesday, August 17th, 1943

At around 4:50PM, elements of the 4th Bomber Group begin landing at their pre-determined bases in North Africa. Twenty-four aircraft from the group are noted lost.

Tuesday, August 17th, 1943

At approximately 6:00PM, elements of the 1st Bomber Group begin landing back at their UK bases. Some 36 aircraft are missing.

Tuesday, August 17th, 1943

The US 3rd Division gives the official "all clear" from their position in Messina. Operation Husky is a success and Sicily is firmly in Allied hands.

Thursday, October 14th, 1943

Some 291 USAAF bombers of the 13th Bombardment Wing are once-again launched against Schweinfurt. Though 30% of German ball-bearing production is knocked out, 60 American aircraft do not return to home bases in the UK. The high level of losses in these raids forces the USAAF to temporarily suspend long-range bombing attacks into Germany.

Tuesday, November 30th, 1943

The British and Americans devise Operation Argument to counter the Luftwaffe threat through a round-the-clock bombing offensive; bad weather postpones any action.

Friday, June 16th, 1944

The 1st Mobile Fleet of the IJN meets up with the Japanese Southern Force west of the Philippines.

Saturday, June 17th, 1944

US amphibious assault elements arrive to take Saipan.



Monday, June 19th, 1944

The first Japanese raid assaults US Task Force 58 through a combined force of IJN and IJA aircraft commitment. The American response nets 35 enemies in the first phase of the attack.

Monday, June 19th, 1944

The second raid of arriving Japanese aerial strike force is identified and attacked by the Americans resulting in some 97 Japanese aircraft downed.

Monday, June 19th, 1944

At 9:05am, the USS Albacore lands a fish into the side of the IJN Taiho aircraft carrier.

Monday, June 19th, 1944

At 12:20pm, the USS Cavalla attack submarine hits the IJN Shokaku with torpedoes.

Monday, June 19th, 1944

The third Japanese attack includes 47 aircraft which are met by 40 American fighters resulting in 7 enemies downed.

Monday, June 19th, 1944

At approximately 4:24pm, the carrier IJN Shokaku, suffering extensive damage from American warplanes, goes under.

Monday, June 19th, 1944

Around 4:28pm, the carrier IJN Taiho joins the IJN Shokaku.

Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

At 4:30pm, some 216 American aircraft are launched in response to the Japanese attacks.

Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

American dive bomber aircraft successfully attack, and subsequently sink, the aircraft carrier IJN Hiyo.

Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

The American aerial force claims another two IJN tanker vessels.

Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

The aircraft carrier - IJN Zuikaku - takes heavy damage from American warplanes.

Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

The aircraft carrier - IJN Chiyoda - takes heavy damage from American warplanes.



Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

During the attack, American fighter pilots score a further 65 enemy aircraft.

Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

By 8:45pm, the American attack shows a loss of 100 aircraft with 80 being lost to landing accidents at night or lack of fuel, forcing many airmen to ditch into the sea.

Tuesday, June 19th, 1944

A fourth Japanese flight group of 49 aircraft is assailed by 27 American Hellcats netting 30 more Japanese targets.

Tuesday, July 18th, 1944

US Army forces seize complete control of the town of St. Lo on the Contentin peninsula. Control of this strategic zone now allows for larger, prepared and controlled Allied offensives towards inland France.

Monday, July 24th, 1944

American forces enact Operation Cobra, this stemming from control of the Contentin peninsula. The goal is to smash through the German defenses and create a road through the Avranches, exposing inland France to future Allied assaults.

Sunday, July 30th, 1944

US Army forces reach Avranches and lay control the region.

Sunday, July 30th, 1944

The German 7th Army attempts a counter-attack at Avranches but the Americans manage to hold their ground.

Tuesday, August 1st, 1944

US General George S. Patton and his 3rd Army manage their way through Avranches towards Liore and Brittany.

Monday, August 7th, 1944

A determined German counter-attack takes Mortain and heads towards Avranches before being stopped. Allied airstrikes and artillery stall the German advance.

Tuesday, August 8th, 1944

US General Omar Bradley talks with British General Benard Law Montgomery about a plan to encircle some 21 divsions of Germans in the Falaise-Argentan pocket. Montgomery likes what he hears and give the plan the green light.

Tuesday, August 8th, 1944

General Patton reaches Le Mans and then heads north to Argentan.

Sunday, August 13th, 1944

Patton's 3rd Army arrives at Argentan.



Monday, August 14th, 1944

Elements of Patton's 3rd Army are sent from Falaise to the east towards Chartres and in the direction of Paris proper.

Wednesday, August 16th, 1944

The American 3rd Army reaches Chartres.

Saturday, August 19th, 1944

At Mantes Grassicourt, a division of the American XV Corps manages to cross the Seine River.

Sunday, August 20th, 1944

The Falaise pocket is finally closed by the Allies. American and Canadian forces meet to complete the encirclement. German forces in Normandy are now trapped.

Tuesday, August 22nd, 1944

After some additional fighting that results in a further 10,000 German soldiers killed, the trapped elements of the German Army at Normandy surrender to the Allies. In all, some 50,000 soldiers of the German Army are taken prisoner.

Friday, August 25th, 1944

The Allies reach the French capital of Paris.

Friday, August 25th, 1944

Paris is liberated by the arriving Allies.

Friday, August 25th, 1944

Patton and his 3rd Army continue their march and setup critical strategic bridgeheads over the Seine River at Elbeuf and Louviers.

Saturday, August 26th, 1944

Brigadier-General Charles de Gaulle, leader of the Free French forces, leads a contingent of Allied troops on a march down the Champs Elysees to a thunderous reception by liberated French citizens.

Sunday, September 17th, 1944

General Dwight Eisenhower, Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in Europe, approves General Montgomery's Operation Market Garden.

Sunday, September 17th, 1944

Operation Market Garden is activated. Parachute landings take place at Eindhoven, Veghel, Grave and Oosterbeek.

Sunday, September 17th, 1944

The US 101st Airborne Division landing at Eindhoven and Veghel are successful in their capturing of bridges.



Sunday, September 17th, 1944

The US 82nd Airborne Division landing at Grave is successful in capturing its target bridge.

Tuesday, September 19th, 1944

The British XXX Corps officially unites with the US 82nd Airborne Division forces having landed at Grave.

Wednesday, September 20th, 1944

The US 82nd Airborne, backed by the British XXX Corps, take the bridge over the Waal River at Nijmegen.

Wednesday, September 27th, 1944

South of Arnhem, Allied forces continue to hold their gains. Over the next few months, some 3,500 casualties will be counted.

Friday, August 4th, 1944

Realizing their chances of victory are slim against well-trained and well-armed Germans, Polish Authorities once again ask the Allies - including the Soviets - for assistance in maintaining the uprising.

Friday, August 11th, 1944

Sensing complete destruction of Warsaw and its people, the Pope himself appeals to the Allies for help.

Monday, September 18th, 1944

American B-17 bombers land at Poltava, now under Soviet control, to refuel. Onboard are arms and supplies meant for the Polish resistance.

Monday, September 18th, 1944

Josef Stalin refuses further Allied use of his forward airfields to resupply the Polish insurgents.

Monday, September 25th, 1944

American air drops deliver their much-needed cargo to the Polish resistance below. However, the drop zones are in firm German control and supplies are captured soon after landing.

Saturday, December 16th, 1944

The German Army launch their Ardennes offensive against elements of the American US VIII located between Aachen and Bastogne.

Saturday, December 16th, 1944

Initial progress on the assault is good for the Germans, however, the US 2nd and 99th Divisions hold fast at Elsenborn and Malmedy.

Saturday, December 16th, 1944

Bad weather soon sets in over the Ardennes region, limiting Allied air support to counter the German advances.



Sunday, December 17th, 1944

Allied prisoners of war are executed in cold blood by elements of the 6th SS Panzer Army. Some 87 prisoners are killed where they stand on direct orders from German Colonel Joachim Peiper.

Saturday, December 23rd, 1944

The foul weather over the Ardennes begins to clear.

Tuesday, December 19th, 1944

By this date, two components making up the US 106th Division at the Schnee Eiffel region are surrounded by the Germans.

Tuesday, December 19th, 1944

Some 6,000 Allied troops surrender to the encircling German Army at Schnee Eiffel.

Tuesday, December 19th, 1944

Along the Ardennes line, US forces reform into intense defensive lines and some forces eventually mount counter attacks against the invading Germans.

Sunday, December 17th, 1944

The town of Stavelot is lost to the invading German Army.

Tuesday, December 19th, 1944

The town of Stavelot is recaptured by the Allies.

Tuesday, December 19th, 1944

Allied generals agree to commit elements of the Saar Front against the southern flanks of the German advance, this in the area between Bastogne and Echternach.

Wednesday, December 20th, 1944

By this date, the 101st Airborne Division at Bastogne is completely encircled by the German XLVII Panzer Corps.

Wednesday, December 20th, 1944

The US 10th and 19th Armored Divisions are completely encircled by the German advance.

Wednesday, December 20th, 1944

British General Montgomery is charged with heading up the progress along the north line of defense while American General Bradley is given command of the south.

Saturday, December 23rd, 1944

2,000 Allied air sorties are launched in improving skies against the Germans on the ground.



Saturday, December 23rd, 1944

Supplies are dropped from Allied transport planes to the beleagured forces held up at Bastogne.

Saturday, December 23rd, 1944

Allied ground attack fighters target and destroy German ground vehicles and troop concentrations. Without air support of their own, there is little that the Germans can do in response.

Monday, December 25th, 1944

After achieving 60 miles of territory - the farthest march of the German Ardennes Offensive - the 2nd Panzer Division under Lieutenant-General von Lauchert is stopped by a combined force of British and American armor made up of the British 29th Armored Brigade and the American 2nd Armored Division.

Monday, December 25th, 1944

German losses on Christmas Day include 3,500 infantrymen and 400 vehicles, 81 of these being tanks.

Tuesday, December 26th, 1944

The American 4th Armored Division makes its way to the beleagured 101st Airborne forces at Bastogne and the situation at the village is stabilized.

Thursday, December 28th, 1944

Hitler orders a halt to the advance - but no retreat - leaving his exposed and tired units at the mercy of the replenished Allied forces across the Ardennes Front.

Saturday, January 1st, 1944

A message to subordinates by US Army Air Force commanding general General H.H. Hap Arnold calls for the destruction of the German Luftwaffe before Allied landings can begin.

Tuesday, January 11th, 1944

The first major Allied offensive to take Cassino is launched.

Sunday, January 16th, 1944

The US IC Corps and the French Expeditionary Corps arrive at Rapido River.

Monday, January 17th, 1944

The US is involved in their first major assault on Cassino.

Tuesday, January 18th - February 9th, 1944

US forces begin making headway through the Liri Valley, capturing ground at Monte Calvario.

Friday, January 21st, 1944

In the afternoon hours, an Allied convoy of 243 ships sets sail from the Bay of Naples for the beaches at Anzio and nearby Nettuno.



Saturday, January 22nd, 1944

Operation Shingle, the amphibious landings at Anzio, is enacted by the Allied. In lead is the US VI Corps under Major-General John Lucas.

Saturday, January 22nd, 1944

By 12AM midnight, some 45,000 Allied troops and 3,000 vehicles are on the beaches.

Saturday, January 22nd, 1944

British forces hold the line at River Moletta.

Saturday, January 22nd, 1944

American forces hold the line at Mussolini Canal.

Sunday, January 23rd, 1944

The Anzio beachhead is consolidated into a concentrated pocket on the orders of Lucas.

Sunday, January 23rd, 1944

German Colonel-General von Mackensen takes control of the new 14th Army headquartered 30 miles west of Rome.

Sunday, January 23rd, 1944

The German Luftwaffe begins heavy strafing attacks and bombardment of Allied forces.

Tuesday, January 25th, 1944

The Anzio beachhead continues to grow with Allied troops and equipment, making it a prime target for the regrouping Germans.

Friday, January 28th, 1944

The US 1st Armored Division captures the town of Aprilia.

Friday, January 28th, 1944

Von Mackensen moves six divisions to Anzio, some ten miles of the Allied beachhead.

Friday, January 28th, 1944

The Germans are driven back at Cisterna.

Friday, January 28th, 1944

Hitler delivers an ultimatum to supreme commander-in-chief over Italy operations, Field Marshall Kesselring, to fight to the death and drive the invading Allied forces into the sea.



Friday, January 28th, 1944

By this date, some 70,000 men, 27,000 tons of goods, 508 artillery guns and 237 tanks are ashore on the beachhead.

Sunday, January 30th, 1944

The Allies suffer some 5,000 casualties in the Anzio action by this date.

Monday, January 31st, 1944

Von Mackensen's forces now number some eight divisions in strength.

Thursday, February 10th, 1944

In a counter offensive, crack German paratroopers repel US forces and previous Allied gains are lost.

Friday, February 11th, 1944

US and Indian losses mount in the offensives against German positions in Calvario, the town of Cassino and Monte Cassino itself.

Friday, February 11th, 1944

The entire US 142nd Regiment is destroyed.

Friday, February 11th, 1944

The 34th and 36th US Divisions both report a high number of casualties from the ensuing offensives.

Friday, February 11th, 1944

A blanket retreat is enacted by the Allies in an attempt to regroup and plan a new strategy to take Cassino.

Saturday, February 12th, 1944

Winston Churchill pens a critical letter to supreme commander-in-chief of Allied operations in Italy. In his writings he claims he expected to see "a wild cat roaring" and has seen nothing but a "whale wallowing on the beaches".

Monday, February 14th, 1944

The offensive is detailed further, taking the latest developments into account.

Monday, February 14th, 1944

American bombers strike the production facilities at Schweinfurt.

Tuesday, February 15th, 1944

In an effort to destroy the believed German defensive positions atop Monte Cassino, Allied bombers numbering 229 strong, lay waste to the monestary.



Tuesday, February 15th, 1944

Following the Allied aerial bombardment, the second major Allied offensive to take Cassino is launched.

Wednesday, February 16th, 1944

Kesselring launches a large counterattack against the invading Allied forces.

Thursday, February 17th, 1944

The Allies lose some four miles of territory but stand fast outside of Anzio.

Saturday, February 19th - March 13th, 1944

The Italian winter makes its arrival and postpones any further Allied offensives for the next month.

Sunday, February 20th, 1944

American bombers and fighters take to the skies in force in support of the new bombing campaign. They number over 1,000 bombers and 660 fighters in escort. Twelve industrial target locations across Germany are hit. 21 American aircraft are lost.

Sunday, February 20th, 1944

The German attack is more or less repelled, at the cost of 5,500 German casualties.

Monday, February 21st, 1944

The Americans respond with another wave of 861 bombers with escorts. The target is the Luftwaffe production center in Brunswick.

Tuesday, February 22nd, 1944

American bomber groups begin medium bombing operations against German targets from bases within Italy.

Tuesday, February 22nd, 1944

Bad weather forces many-an-inflight accident for US bomber groups. Some 41 aircraft are lost. Nijmegen is accidentally bombed, causing over 200 civilian deaths.

Tuesday, February 22nd, 1944

The Allies replace the ineffective Major-General Lucas with Major-General Lucius Truscott.

Wednesday, February 23rd, 1944

Bad weather postpones any further bombing actions for the time being. The Allies take this time to regroup, repair, and restock.

Thursday, February 24th, 1944

With weather clearing, operations of Big Week continue. 266 American bombers strike Schweinfurt.



Thursday, February 24th, 1944

Over 900 American bombers are sent airborne to bomb aircraft-producing factories including Schweinfurt.

Thursday, February 24th, 1944

The USAAF 1st Division launches another bombing raid on Schweinfurt through 238 bombers and long-range escort fighters. Eleven aircraft are lost.

Friday, February 25th, 1944

The final American air raid of Big Week is launched with 900 bombers against Regensburg, Augsburg and Forth.

Friday, February 25th, 1944

By the end of it all, 3,300 Allied sorties are launched in the offensive and 226 bombers are lost. 290 German fighters are destroyed and another further 90 are damaged.

Tuesday, February 29th, 1944

Von Mackensen cancels the German offensive amidst mounting casualties and little gain.

Wednesday, March 1st - May 22nd, 1944

The Anzio engagement is limited to minor activity for the time being, with the Allies dug in and the Germans trying to dislodge the invaders by limited means.

Wednesday, March 15th, 1944

A third major Allied offensive is put into action.