World War 2 Events by Country - Japan


Listing of all day-by-day events of the Second World War related to the nation of Japan.

World War 2 spanned across language barriers, cultures, and borders as it wreaked havoc around the globe. The conflict was made up of several major theaters - spanning nearly all oceans and continents - which contained many individual campaigns and, within these, key battles and events on both the military and political spectrums. The war was fought with equal fervor and verocity across the land, on the sea (and under it), and in the air as millions of men and women answered the call of their respective flags - or happened to find themselves in the war's path with no option but to fight. In the end, the fractured world opened its eyes to a new order - one that would usher in a whole new trial in the Cold War and lead to the establishment of dozens of independent countries heading towards the end of the century.


There are a total of (274) World War 2 Events by Country - Japan events in the Second World War timeline database. Entries are listed below by date-of-occurrence ascending (first-to-last). Other leading and trailing events may also be included for perspective.





Tuesday, April 10th, 1945

The American 27th Infantry Division lands at Tsugen. The island is just to the east of Okinawa proper.
Wednesday, April 11th, 1945

The conquest of Tsugen is completed by the 27th Infantry Division.
Friday, April 13th, 1945

US Marines reach Hedo Point in the north of Okinawa.
Monday, April 16th, 1945

A five-day offensive is undertaken involving the American 77th Infantry Division and the island of Ie Shima. Ie Shima represents the tip of the Motobu Peninsula. Motobu is a defensive Japanese stronghold located to the west of Okinawa proper.
Thursday, April 19th, 1945

Japanese defenders are pushed back towards Naha by American forces. The Japanese defensive lines are reset as territory is lost. The Americans report 1,000 casualties in their assaults.
Thursday, April 1st, 1942

The Japanese aircraft carrier Ryujo enters the Bay of Bengal.
Sunday, April 1st, 1945

Two US Army and USMC divisions land along the southwest coast of Okinawa near Hagushi, meeting little resistance. The US 10th Army is commanded by Lieutenant General Simon Bolivar Buckner. Some 550,000 personnel and 180,000 soldiers take part in the fray.
Friday, April 20th, 1945

Motobu Peninsula falls to the Americans as the Japanese defenders are either killed or captured.
Saturday, April 21st, 1945

The offensive to take Ie Shima is completed.
Friday, April 3rd, 1942

No fewer than five Japanese Navy aircraft carriers reach the Indian Ocean.
Saturday, April 4th, 1942

A small contingent of British Royal Navy vessels operating in the Indian Ocean are warned of the arriving Japanese Navy force.
Saturday, April 4th, 1942

Admiral Sir James Somerville detaches a force to intercept the arriving Japanese fleet.
Thursday, April 5th, 1945

Allied forces find and locate the Japanese defenders along the southern portion of Okinawa. Heavy defenses are noted.
Monday, April 6th, 1942

The Imperial Japanese Navy unleashes a surprise attack, with some 120 aircraft, on British forces at Columbo Harbor, Ceylon.
Monday, April 6th, 1942

Twenty-six Allied aircraft are destroyed.
Monday, April 6th, 1942

The British Royal Navy cruisers HMS Cornwall and HMS Dorsetshire are sunk by the Japanese air strike.
Monday, April 6th, 1942

The British Royal Navy destroyer HMS Tenedos is sunk by the Japanese air strike.
Friday, April 6th, 1945

As American forces move further inland, the battle for Okinawa intensifies. Pockets of dug-in Japanese defenders become evermore concentrated the more inland the Allied forces go.
Friday, April 6th, 1945

American forces are now amassed as two separate assault fronts. To the north are the 1st and 6th Marine divisions. To the mountainous south are the 7th and 96th Infantry divisions.
Friday, April 6th, 1945

The deadly kamikaze air attack is unleashed on American Naval vessels in the Pacific. These aircraft appear as coordinated airstrikes and prove equally deadly to both sides. USN vessels off the coast of Okinawa itself are targeted. Some 34 US Navy ships fall victim.
Friday, April 6th, 1945

The IJN Yamato, Japan's pride and joy and the largest battleship ever built, sails from the Inland Sea on a suicide mission at Okinawa. She is escorted by the light cruiser Yahagi and some eight destroyers on her final voyage.
Saturday, April 7th, 1945

The IJN Yamato, having already been spotted by an American submarine, makes its way to the fighting at Okinawa. The crew understand that this is a suicide mission at this point in the war.
Saturday, April 7th, 1945

In the early morning hours, US Navy reconnaissance aircraft spot the IJN Yamato and relay her position.
Saturday, April 7th, 1945

Task Force 38 launches some 380 aircraft against IJN Yamato.
Saturday, April 7th, 1945

With no air cover, the IJN Yamato is blasted to pieces by the American Navy warplanes. Her magazine stores explode in a fantastic display as she goes up in smoke. Most of her crew is lost with the ship in the afternoon hours.
Thursday, April 9th, 1942

American forces fighting on the Bataan Peninsula finally surrender to the Japanese.
Thursday, April 9th, 1942

An 85-strong Japanese Navy aircraft contingent attacks airfields and targets of opportunity at Trincomalee, Ceylon.
Thursday, April 9th, 1942

The HMS Hermes is one of four Royal Navy ships sunk by Japanese Navy aircraft.
Friday, August 10th, 1945

Following the drop of a second atomic bomb on one of its major cities, the Emperor of Japan formally supports a Japanese surrender to the terms specified in the Potsdam Conference.
Friday, August 14th, 1942

The Japanese Army gains vital territory leading up and into the Owen Stanley Range.
Friday, August 14th, 1942

The Japanese Army takes control of the village of Kokoda.
Friday, August 14th, 1942

The Japanese Army reaches Isurava just outside of Port Moresby.
Sunday, August 15th, 1943

The Aleutian Islands Campaign comes to a close. The Japanese invasion is ultimately repelled.
Wednesday, August 15th, 1945

For the first time during his tenure, Emperor Hirohito speaks to his people, calling on his commanders to support his order to surrender to the Allies.
Tuesday, August 18th, 1942

A Japanese counteroffensive sees an amphibious landing take place at Taivu. This landing zone is just 32 miles east of Henderson Field.
Thursday, August 20th, 1942

The first of thirty-one US fighter aircraft arrive at Henderson Field.
Friday, August 21st, 1942

Japanese ground forces attempt attacks against Henderson Field and American forces at Tenaru. The Japanese troops make little headway and are themselves encircled.
Saturday, August 22nd, 1942

The Japanese attackers at Henderson Field and Tenaru are ultimately destroyed, forcing Colonel Ichiki to commit ritual suicide.
Sunday, August 23rd, 1942

The Battle of the Eastern Solomons begins.
Sunday, August 23rd, 1942

The Imperial Japanese Navy enacts a plan to resupply their forces at Guadalcanal under the cover of three aircraft carriers made up of the IJN Ryujo, the IJN Shokaku and the IJN Zuikaku.
Sunday, August 23rd, 1942

US naval patrol aircraft spot the incoming Japanese convoy, radioing positions back to the main task force.
Thursday, August 23rd, 1945

The Soviets claim the complete victory in Manchuria over the defeated Japanese Army. The war has cost the conquered some 80,000 KIA with a further 594,000 taken prisoner to an unknown fate. In comparison, the Soviets lose just 8,000 of their own with 22,000 wounded.
Monday, August 24th, 1942

The US Navy claims a Japanese aircraft carrier. The carrier is attacked and sunk.
Monday, August 24th, 1942

US naval patrol aircraft once again spot the incoming Japanese convoy. Positions are sent to Task Force 61.
Monday, August 24th, 1942

Task Force 61, comprised of the USS Enterprise, USS Saratoga and the USS Wasp head to intercept the Japanese convoy.
Monday, August 24th, 1942

Task Force 61 sets up at locations east of Malaita Island in preparation for the battle. Aircraft are launched form the American carriers beginning what is known as the Battle of the Eastern Solomons.
Monday, August 24th, 1942

At 3:15PM, American carrier aircaft from the USS Enterprise manage hits on the IJN Shokaku.
Monday, August 24th, 1942

Dive bombers and torpedo bombers from the USS Enterprise manage critical hits against the IJN Ryujo and sink here where she stood at 3:50PM.
Monday, August 24th, 1942

At about 4:41PM, the USS Enterprise is the victim of Japanese dive bombers and takes several direct hits but manages to keep fighting.
Monday, August 24th, 1942

The Japanese Navy lose their seaplane carrier - the IJN Chitose - to American dive bombers at 5:40PM.
Tuesday, August 25th, 1942

The Japanese Navy loses a pair of transport ships enroute to the Solomon Island chain.
Tuesday, August 25th, 1942

The Battle of the Eastern Solomons ends with the Japanese Navy claiming at least 90 aircraft lost while the American Navy enjoys victory with 20 aircraft lost in the fray.
Tuesday, August 25th, 1942

The Japanese Navy completes an amphibious landing at Milne Bay to establish a beachhead and open a second front on New Guinea.
Wednesday, August 26th, 1942

The 18th Australian Brigade, utilizing valuable intelligence reports, meet the arriving Japanese amphibious forces head-on and hold the Japanese beachhead at Milne Bay.
Saturday, August 29th, 1942

A further 600 Japanese Army soldiers are landed at Milne Bay to help strengthen the beachhead.
Sunday, August 30th, 1942

American General Douglas MacArthur employs his superiors for additional firepower and troop strength to help hold Papua.
Monday, August 31st, 1942

By this date, the Japanese have completed their takeovers of the Caroline Islands, the Gilbert Islands, the Marshall Islands, the Marianas Islands and a portion of the Solomon Islands. This is the farthest that the Japanese Empire would reach in the Pacific.
Saturday, August 4th, 1945

In the Far East theater of Burma, the remaining elements of the Japanese 28th Army are destroyed.
Thursday, August 6th, 1942

US Navy and Marine forces position themselves near Guadalcanal.
Monday, August 6th, 1945

The Boeing B-29 Superfortress 'Enola Gay' drops the first of two atomic bombs on the Japanese mainland - the target being the densely populated city of Hiroshima. About 70,000 of its citizens are killed and a further 70,000 are injured in the blast. Many more will die in the coming years from its effects.
Friday, August 7th, 1942

Amphibious forces spearheaded by the United States Marines begin against the Japanese-held island of Guadalcanal.
Saturday, August 8th, 1942

The amphibious landings largely conclude by this date.
Saturday, August 8th, 1942

By the end of the day and facing next to no opposition, the US soldiers capture and secure Henderson Field.
Saturday, August 8th, 1942

Naval battles ultimately ensure between the Imperial Japanese Navy and the United States Navy for control of Guadalcanal.
Saturday, August 8th, 1942

Japanese bombers attack US forces at Henderson Field.
Saturday, August 8th, 1942

Just outside of Guadalcanal, the islands of Tulagi and Gavutu fall to the Allies.
Saturday, August 8th, 1942

A large contingent of Imperial Japanese Navy warships heads out of Rabaul towards Savo Island to strike at US Navy transports there.
Sunday, August 9th, 1942

Three US and one Australian cruiser are sunk by the Japanese Navy during the morning hours.
Thursday, August 9th, 1945

In the Manchurian Theater, the Soviets commit some 1.5 million troops against the Japanese's Kwantung Army.
Thursday, August 9th, 1945

A United States B-29 bomber delivers a second atomic bomb on the Japanese mainland, this time on the city of Nagasaki. This is in direct response to Tokyo's disregard of previous ultimatums by the Allies calling for an immediate and unconditional surrender. Some 35,000 are killed in the blast with another 60,000 citizens injured.
Wednesday, December 10th, 1941

Along the north of Luzon - at Aparri, Gonzago and Vigan - two large Japanese Army forces land via amphibious assault.
Thursday, December 11th, 1941

As expected, Germany and Italy side with Japan and officially declare war on the United States
Friday, December 12th, 1941

The airfields at Laoang and Tuguegarao fall to the Japanese invaders.
Monday, December 14th, 1942

Allied Australian and US forces continued their maches against the Japanese, taking territory through fierce firefights.
Monday, December 22nd, 1941

The Japanese 48th Division lands at Lingayen Bay on Luzon.
Tuesday, December 23rd, 1941

The order is given by American General Douglas MacArthur to retreat from Luzon and take up positions on the Bataan Peninsula.
Tuesday, December 23rd, 1941

MacArthur's forces are cut-off from further retreat by a Japanese Army force advancing from the south.
Tuesday, December 23rd, 1941

Despite an out-numbered yet heroic resistance on the part of American forces, Wake Island falls to the Japanese.
Tuesday, December 23rd, 1941

The American military detachment at Wake Island surrenders. During their stand, the Americans accounted for at least 1,000 Japanese casualties and 4 Japanese navy warships.
Thursday, December 25th, 1941

The Japanese 48th Division makes substantial progress against American forces, working their way towards the capital city of Manila.
Saturday, December 27th, 1941

The Philippine capital city of Manila eventually falls to the invading Japanese Army.
Saturday, December 6th, 1941

American President Franklin Roosevelt sends a final peace appeal to the Empire of Japan to which there is no answer.
Saturday, December 6th, 1941

American codebreakers begin tracking down a multi-part message - made up of 14 total components. Only the first 13 are actually deciphered, each being passed on to the President and the Secretary of State.
Saturday, December 6th, 1941

An attack against America is now deemed imminent though the consensus being that it will occur against interests somehwere in Southeast Asia.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At 9AM, the final Japanese message is broken down. It essentially directs its Washington envoy to break off diplomatic relations with America.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At approximately 10AM, a follow-up message is intercepted - meant for the Japanese diplomats in Washington - to delay handling of the previous message to the Americans until 1PM. The Americans now understand that an attack is imminent and the target is the US Naval fleet at Pearl Harbor.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

It is discovered that communication lines from Washington to Hawaii are down for the moment, forcing the US War Department to use a commercial telegraph service to warn forces on the Hawaiian Islands.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

The Imperial Japanese Navy attack commences with their assault. The force is made up of 423 aircraft and converges on the Hawaiian Islands.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At 6:00AM, the first wave of 183 Japanese Navy aircraft takes off from their carriers, just north of Oahu, to make the 230 mile trek. The target is the US Pacific Fleet.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At 7:02AM, the Japanese attack wave is located on American radar by two US Army personnel who bring it to the attention of a junior officer. The officer, expecting a flight of Boeing B-17 Flying Fortresses to arrive that day, disregards the alert.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At approximately 7:15AM, the second wave of 167 Japanese Navy planes takes off from their carriers towards Pearl.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At 7:53AM, complete surprise by the Japanese Navy and the first wave begins their initial strike. This force is made up of 50 medium bombers, 43 A6M Zero fighters and 40 Kate torpedo bombers. Targets are the battleships hunkered down in the harbor and airfields used by the USAAF.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

The second wave of Japanese Navy aircraft swoops in attacking targets of opportunity including auxiliary ships in the harbor and the all-important harbor facilities.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

The attack on Pearl Harbor is over at 9:45AM. Over 2,400 people are killed and a further 1,178 are wounded. More die in the ensuing days while 1,104 sailors eventually perish within the hull of the battleship USS Arizona, its magazine stores ignited by a single Japanese bomb.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

At 2:30PM Eastern Time, the Japanese diplomats in Washington finally visit with US Secretary of State Cordell Hull. With them is the Japanese declaration of war.
Sunday, December 7th, 1941

In conjunction with the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Wake Island is assaulted by a Japanese invasion force all its own - this under the command of Rear-Admiral Kajioka Sadamichi.
Monday, December 8th, 1941

The United States, along with Britain, formally declare war on the Empire of Japan.
Wednesday, December 9th, 1942

The Australian Army liberates the village of Gona from the hold of the Japanese Amry.
Saturday, February 14th, 1942

By this time, the Japanese have captured Borneo, Celebes and Sarawak.
Sunday, February 15th, 1942

Singapore eventually falls to the might of the Japanese assault resulting in the capture of some 60,000 Allied prisoners against the cost of 2,000 Japanese soldiers.
Thursday, February 19th, 1942

The Japanese 1st Air Fleet conducts a surprise attack on Allied ships at Broome and Darwin. Twelve ships are sunk in the assault.
Monday, February 1st, 1943

A massive evacuation effort sees some 11,000 Japanese personnel moved fom Tenaro, Gaudalcanal.
Sunday, February 7th, 1943

Gaudalcanal officially falls to the Americans.
Sunday, February 7th, 1943

The last remnants of the Japanese Army on Guadalcanal is evacuated from the island.
Sunday, January 10th, 1943

The decision to abandon Guadalcanal is made by Japanese autorities.
Sunday, January 11th, 1942

Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaya, falls to the invading Japanese 5th Division.
Sunday, January 11th, 1942

Three Japanese amphibious forces take on the Dutch East Indies.
Sunday, January 14th, 1940

A new government is formed in Japan under Admiral Mitsumasa Yonai following the resignation of PM Nobuyuki Abe.
Thursday, January 15th, 1942

Japanese forces invade Burma beginning their assault at Victoria Point.
Sunday, January 17th, 1943

The Japanese begin to withdraw their battered army units from Guadalcanal.
Monday, January 19th, 1942

The Japanese Army makes short work of the light British defenses, covering some 230 miles in reaching Tavoy.
Friday, January 23rd, 1942

The American defensive lines finally break.
Sunday, January 31st, 1943

Sananada is officially in Allied hands.
Sunday, January 31st, 1943

The Kokoda Trail is firmly in Allied hands by this date.
Sunday, January 3rd, 1943

American forces lay claim to Buna.
Friday, January 9th, 1942

The Japanese begin their offensive against the dug-in American forces on the Bataan Peninsula.
Thursday, July 12th, 1945

The Allies conduct an amphibious landing at Sarangini Bay in a step towards removing the Japanese defenders at Mindanao.
Monday, July 16th, 1945

The Americans complete the detonation of the world's first atomic bomb under the codename of "Manhattan Project". The operation takes place at Alamogordo in New Mexico. Such bombs are intended to be used on the Japanese mainland to help finish the war.
Tuesday, July 17th - August 2nd, 1945

Allied leaders meet for the Potsdam Conference to discuss the post-war world order. Chuchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin are the primary leaders in attendance.
Thursday, July 18th, 1940

The British close down the Burma Road supply route to China in an effort to avoid war with Japan.
Thursday, July 19th, 1945

Elements of the Japanese 28th Army attempt to push out of Pegu Yomas against the Indian 17th. Japanese forces are slaughtered by gunfire and the escape fails.
Wednesday, July 1st - July 31st, 1942

The Allies received word on the construction of a strategic Japanese airfield (Henderson Field) on the island of Guadalcanal, part of the Solomon Islands. As such, plans are set in motion to curtail construction of the endeavor. US Navy and Marine forces spring into action.
Tuesday, July 21st, 1942

Japanese Major General Horii and his 18th Army land near Buna.
Wednesday, July 22nd, 1942

Major General Horii and his 18th Army march towards Port Moresby.
Wednesday, July 22nd, 1942

The Japanese Army gain ground on the US, Australian and Papuan Infantry Regiment defenders.
Thursday, July 25th, 1940

In an effort to disrupt the Japanese war economy, the U.S. government enacts a restrictive licensing program for its export of important steel and oil products.
Thursday, July 26th, 1945

Japanese defenders on Mindanao in the Philippines are defeated.
Saturday, July 28th, 1945

Japanese leaders disregard the proclamations by Allied leaders made at the Potsdam Conference.
Tuesday, July 3rd - 11th, 1945

About 6,000 men, left over from the decimated Japanese 33rd Army, assail Allied positions at Waw. The fighting lasts until July 11th when the attackers are finally driven off by combined Allied air and ground assaults.
Friday, June 16th, 1944

The 1st Mobile Fleet of the IJN meets up with the Japanese Southern Force west of the Philippines.
Sunday, June 17th, 1945

By this time, the Japanese defenders have been seperated into three major fighting groups. The more raw recruits find it somewhat easy to surrender than fight to the death.
Saturday, June 17th, 1944

US amphibious assault elements arrive to take Saipan.
Monday, June 19th, 1944

The first Japanese raid assaults US Task Force 58 through a combined force of IJN and IJA aircraft commitment. The American response nets 35 enemies in the first phase of the attack.
Monday, June 19th, 1944

The second raid of arriving Japanese aerial strike force is identified and attacked by the Americans resulting in some 97 Japanese aircraft downed.
Monday, June 19th, 1944

At 9:05am, the USS Albacore lands a fish into the side of the IJN Taiho aircraft carrier.
Monday, June 19th, 1944

At 12:20pm, the USS Cavalla attack submarine hits the IJN Shokaku with torpedoes.
Monday, June 19th, 1944

The third Japanese attack includes 47 aircraft which are met by 40 American fighters resulting in 7 enemies downed.
Monday, June 19th, 1944

At approximately 4:24pm, the carrier IJN Shokaku, suffering extensive damage from American warplanes, goes under.
Monday, June 19th, 1944

Around 4:28pm, the carrier IJN Taiho joins the IJN Shokaku.
Tuesday, June 19th, 1944

A fourth Japanese flight group of 49 aircraft is assailed by 27 American Hellcats netting 30 more Japanese targets.
Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

At 4:30pm, some 216 American aircraft are launched in response to the Japanese attacks.
Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

American dive bomber aircraft successfully attack, and subsequently sink, the aircraft carrier IJN Hiyo.
Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

The American aerial force claims another two IJN tanker vessels.
Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

The aircraft carrier - IJN Zuikaku - takes heavy damage from American warplanes.
Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

The aircraft carrier - IJN Chiyoda - takes heavy damage from American warplanes.
Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

During the attack, American fighter pilots score a further 65 enemy aircraft.
Tuesday, June 20th, 1944

By 8:45pm, the American attack shows a loss of 100 aircraft with 80 being lost to landing accidents at night or lack of fuel, forcing many airmen to ditch into the sea.
Friday, June 22nd, 1945

The fighting on Okinawa comes to a close as American forces overwhelm the islands determined Japanese defenders. Those that are not taken prisoner or die in the fighting, subject themselves to ritual suicides.
Friday, June 22nd, 1945

Understanding that defeat is iminent, Japanese Lieutenant General Mitsuru Ushjima commits ritual suicide with his staff after reporting the loss of Okinawa to his superiors.
Friday, June 22nd, 1945

The Battle of Okinawa officially draws to a close and now represents the all-important staging area for the Allied invasion of the Japanese mainland.
Wednesday, June 3rd, 1942

The Northern Task Force begins its operation to take the Aleutian Island chain and divert USN forces to the region.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 4:30AM, the bombing of Midway Island begins with aircraft from Vice-Admiral Nagumo's First Carrier Strike Force.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

American fighter aircraft take heavy losses but force the Japanese Navy to launch a second attack.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 7:28AM, a Japanese reconniassance plane spots spots ten undetermined USN surface ships 200 miles northeast of the Japanese Midway invasion force.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 7:52AM, USS Enterprise and USS Hornet launch their dive bombers and torpedo planes.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 8:20AM, a surprised Nagumo receives his first report of American carriers in the area.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 8:37AM, aircraft of the second Japanese strike force returns to their respective carriers for rearming and refueling.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 9:00AM, USS Yorktown launches her aircraft with Nagumo's carrier force as the prime target.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

Between 9:30AM and 10:00AM, Torpedo planes from the USS Enterprise and USS Hornet begin their attacks on the Japanese carriers.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 9:18AM, Nagumo reacts to the American presence and changes the course of his Carrier Strike Force.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

The first wave of USN carrier dive-bombers has difficulty in locating their Japanese targets.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

All incoming USN Devastator attackers are shot down by Japanese Zero fighters in the span of six minutes.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

The initial American assault on the Japanese carrier strike force is over by 10:00AM.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 10:25AM, a follow-up strike made up of 37 Dauntless dive bombers finds the Japanese carriers - now stocked with armed and fueled aircraft on their decks.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

The three Japanese carriers - Kaga, Soryu and Akagi - are struck with bombs and ultimately sunk.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 12:00PM, Imperial Japanese Navy bomber aircraft strike against the attacking USS Yorktown.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

By 2:30PM, the USS Yorktown is severely damaged but does not sink.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

By 3:00PM, the crew of the USS Yorktown has abandoned their carrier. The damaged vessel is towed by USN ships.
Thursday, June 4th, 1942

At 5:00PM, the Imperial Japanese aircraft carrier Hiryu is set ablaze after being struck by no fewer than five direct bomb hits from aircraft of the USS Enterprise.
Friday, June 5th, 1942

The Japanese carrier Hiryu is scuttled.
Saturday, June 6th, 1942

The USS Yorktown, now severely damaged and in tow of US Navy forces, is targeted and sunk by a Japanese submarine.
Saturday, June 6th, 1942

The island of Kiska is taken by Japanese forces.
Sunday, June 7th, 1942

The island of Attu is taken by Japanese forces.
Saturday, March 24th, 1945

In preparation for the amphibious assault landings on the island of Okinawa, US Naval elements begin bombardment of shoreline positions.
Saturday, March 24th, 1945

The US 77th Infantry Division lands at the Kerama Islands to secure a staging post for the eventual invasion of Okinawa.
Thursday, March 29th, 1945

Further landings of US forces on the Kerama Islands, complete its capture for the Allies.
Sunday, March 30th, 1941

United States vessels capture some sixty-five ships aligned with the Axis powers.
Saturday, March 31st, 1945

The US Navy lobs some 30,000 explosive shells on the Okinawa coastline by this time, ending a week of bombardment.
Sunday, March 8th, 1942

By this date, the Japanese capture the Dutch East Indies with the occupations of Bali, Timor and Java.
Sunday, March 8th, 1942

Japan invades New Guinea.
Sunday, March 8th, 1942

Rangoon, Burma falls to the Japanese.
Sunday, March 8th, 1942

The British Burma Army escapes anhilation in Burma.
Sunday, March 8th, 1942

Japanese forces, numbering two battalions strong, land at Lae and Salamaua in New Guinea.
Friday, May 15th, 1942

Burma falls to the Japanese.
Monday, May 25th, 1942

A large Imperial Japanese Naval force sails for Japan towards Midway Island. The force Is made up of four task forces. One is charged with the invasion of the Aleutian Islands off of Alaska while the other three are to take Midway Island itself and assail the responding USN fleet. One group contains the required four aircraft carriers.
Sunday, May 27th, 1945

Naha is officially captured by American forces. The Orouku Peninsula to the south is now within reach.
Thursday, May 28th, 1942

The final Imperial Japanese Task Force leaves mainland Japan.
Sunday, May 3rd, 1942

Forces of the Imperial Japanese Army land at Tulagi of the Solomons island group. Subsequent develop ensures a base of operations for Japanese logistics in the region.
Sunday, May 3rd, 1942

An Imperial Japanese Navy carrier force sets sail on patrol around the Solomons looking for American carrier battle groups.
Sunday, May 3rd, 1942

American intelligence intercepts various Japanese communications and is able to piece together the intention to invade Port Moresby, New Guinea.
Monday, May 4th, 1942

USS Yorktown launched strike aircraft south of Guadalcanal. At 6:30AM, the American Navy aircraft spot and subsequently target Japanese land emplacements and sea vessels in the area.
Monday, May 4th, 1942

The Japanese invasion force leaves Rabaul, New Britain, heading towards Port Moresby, New Guinea.
Friday, May 4th, 1945

The Japanese enact a major offensive in the south of Okinawa. A coast-to-coast defensive front is established from Naha to Yonabaru. Regardless, the line is targeted by prolonged American firepower and infantry.
Tuesday, May 5th, 1942

The Japanese enact an offensive to take Corregidor Island, a strategic point providing access to Manila Bay.
Wednesday, May 5th - May 6th, 1942

Foul weather limits detection of either carrier force across a two day span.
Wednesday, May 6th, 1942

Corregidor Island falls to the Japanese, giving the invaders control over Manila Bay.
Thursday, May 7th, 1942

Allied Task Force 44, headed by Royal Navy Rear-Admiral Crace, moves in to intercept the Japanese invasion force. However, the force is prematurely spotted by Japanese reconnaissance aircraft resulting in a counter-assault of the Task Force by Japanese Navy warplanes. Crace and his force never make the intercept.
Thursday, May 7th, 1942

The USS Neosho and the USS Sims are sunk by Japanese aircraft.
Thursday, May 7th, 1942

The Allies spot the Japanese Covering Group escorting the invasion force.
Thursday, May 7th, 1942

The USS Lexington and the USS Yorktown launch their attack planes and sink the Japanese aircraft carrier Shoho in the process.
Thursday, May 7th, 1942

The Japanese invasion of Port Moresby is called off.
Friday, May 8th, 1942

The Japanese invasion force heads back to New Britain.
Friday, May 8th, 1942

Some 27 Japanese aircraft are launched under the cover of darkness in the hopes of locating the Allied Task Force. They come up empty and only six aircraft return safely home.
Friday, May 8th, 1942

Just past dawn, the Japanese and American carrier groups spot one another.
Friday, May 8th, 1942

At 9:25AM, Japanese and American warplanes take to the skies.
Friday, May 8th, 1942

At 11:40AM, US Navy warplanes manage to score devastating hits to the Japanese aircraft carrier Shokaku, severely damaging her.
Friday, May 8th, 1942

At 2:47PM, the American carrier USS Lexington is hit by a Japanese torpedo, causing a major explosion in her generator room.
Friday, May 8th, 1942

By 6:00PM that evening, nearly all of the USS Lexington's sailors have been rescued.
Friday, May 8th, 1942

At 6:10PM, the USS Lexington is a complete loss. She is scuttled and sunk.
Saturday, May 9th, 1942

Despite numbers against him, Japanese Vice-Admiral Takagi is ordered to send his warplanes aloft.
Saturday, May 9th, 1942

The Japanese aircraft do not locate the American fleet and any further actions are called off, effectively ending the Battle of Coral Sea.
Wednesday, November 10th, 1943

The combined force of US Army and Marine Corps troops numbering 35,000 personnel heads towards Betio on the Tarawa Atoll.
Saturday, November 13th, 1943

US Navy warplanes and warships begin the bombardment of Japanese positions at Makin and Tarawa in preparation for the planned amphibious assaults.
Sunday, November 15th, 1942

US forces continue their march from the south against Japanese-held areas.
Sunday, November 15th, 1942

Australian forces continue their march from the west against Japanese-held areas.
Sunday, November 1st, 1942

Japanese Army troops have taken to reinforcing their existing defenses at Buna, Gona and Sanananda.
Sunday, November 1st - January 31st, 1942

Neither force can claim much action during this span. In time, US forces number some 58,000 troops while Japan can claim 20,000-strong.
Saturday, November 20th, 1943

US Navy warplanes and warships conclude their bombardment of Japanese positions.
Saturday, November 20th, 1943

At 9:10AM, the first US Marine soldiers make it ashore at Betio during the initial amphibious landings. Nearly half are cut down in low waters by the waiting Japanese defenders.
Saturday, November 20th, 1943

US tanks and armored vehicles finally make it ashore and strengthen the US Marine presence on the beaches.
Saturday, November 20th, 1943

By the end of the first day of operations, some three US Marine battalions have made it onto the beaches.
Sunday, November 21st, 1943

Another US amphibious landing, this consisting of both Army and Marine elements, makes it to the shores on Makin.
Sunday, November 21st, 1943

US forces at Makin kill some 800 defending Japanese soldiers, leaving just a lone survivor.
Sunday, November 21st, 1943

US forces officially take Makin and give the "Makin Taken" signal.
Sunday, November 21st, 1943

US forces take Apamama after the suicide of its 22-strong Japanese garrison.
Sunday, November 21st, 1943

US forces continue their progress against the Gilberts though a dogged Japanese resistance makes for slow progress.
Monday, November 22nd, 1943

By 8PM on this date, US forces lay claim to portions of the Gilberts at its east and central regions.
Monday, November 22nd, 1943

By night time hours, the Japanese enact a counter-attack against US forces, hoping to regain lost ground and take their invaders by surprise.
Tuesday, November 23rd, 1943

The Japanese assault is repelled with a tremendous loss of life for the IJA. The dead number some 500 personnel in hours of fighting.
Tuesday, November 23rd, 1943

The final Japanese defenders at Betio capitulate.
Tuesday, November 23rd, 1943

With the fall of Betio, the Gilbert Islands are now under control of US forces.
Wednesday, November 26th, 1941

The Japanese naval fleet leaves home port and heads to Hawaii.
Saturday, November 30th, 1940

Japan formally recognizes the puppet regime of China led by President Wang Ching-wei.
Saturday, October 10th, 1942

Japanese reinforcements are shipped to the west and disembarked at Tenaro, some 20 miles from American forces.
Sunday, October 11th, 1942

A Japanese Navy convoy headed through the Eastern and Western Solomons is intercepted by a US Navy force, beginning what is known as the Battle of Cape Esperance.
Sunday, October 11th, 1942

At 11:32PM, US Navy warships fire upon IJN vessels in the convoy, sinking the IJN Fubuki and damaging the IJN Furutaka and IJN Aoba, which themselves begin sinking.
Sunday, October 11th, 1942

At midnight, the Japanese convoy is in retreat and gone from the region in roughly 30 minutes.
Sunday, October 11th, 1942

The IJN Furutaka officially sinks at 12:40AM.
Thursday, October 15th, 1942

American soldiers of the 32nd US Division complete an amphibious assault near Pongani and Wanigela on Papua.
Wednesday, October 16th, 1940

The Dutch East Indies government and Japan agree to a six-months-long transfer of oil.
Friday, October 23rd, 1942

Some 20,000 Japanese fighters, including elements of the 2nd Division and 17th Army, undertake a new offensive under the direction of General Maruyama.
Sunday, October 25th, 1942

Japanese Navy supply ships make their way offshore of Guadalcanal where land forces there are attempting to take Henderson Field.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

After some 3,500 casualties are netted against the Japanese attackers, the offensive stalls and is ultimately called off.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

A USN Consolidated PBY Catalina flying boat scout plane spots the Japanese waterforce and relays their position.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

The US Navy sends Task Force 16 and 17 to intercept the Japanese resupply action.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

US Navy aircraft are launched from USS Enterprise and USS Hornet but fail to locate the Japanese ships.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

A PBY Catalina, capable of limited bombing, misses its mark as it attempts to hit several Japanese aircraft carriers at 2:50AM.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

USS Enterprise launches a wave of Dauntless dive bombers in search of the Japanese group. Some 22 total aircraft are launched.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

72 aircraft are launched as a combined force from USS Enterprise and USS Hornet.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

The IJN carrier launch around 110 aircraft in response.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

At 7:40AM, USN dive bombers damage the IJN carrier Zuiho.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

US Navy and IJN aircraft formally meet in air to air combat by 8:15AM.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

The USS Hornet takes a critical hit at 9:15AM from attacking Japanese Navy dive bombers and torpedo bombers. The IJN forces claim two torpedo hits and a further six bomb hits against her.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

The crew of the USS Hornet begin evacuation procedures aboard their doomed ship.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

The crippled IJN carrier Zuiho is hit by another four bombs, bringing her tenure at sea to an official close at 9:18AM.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

USN bombers score several key direct hits against the carrier IJN Shokaku at 9:30AM.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

USS Enterprise receives several direct hits from IJN dive bombers against her flight deck and forward elevator.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

The Americans signal a withdrawal of all forces form the battle.
Monday, October 26th, 1942

The USS Hornet is cleared of all crew by 11:40AM.
Tuesday, October 27th, 1942

Destroyers of the IJN come across the remains of the USS Hornet and launch torpedoes against her, sending her to the bottom of the Pacific.
Saturday, September 12th, 1942

Some 6,000 Japanese Army personnel are used in a final thrust against the Americans at Henderson field. Among the attackers is the Japanese 35th Brigade.
Sunday, September 13th, 1942

Japanese forces come within a half-a-mile of Henderson Field before being stopped and, ultimately, driven back.
Monday, September 14th, 1942

At the end of the Henderson Field offensive, the fanatical Japanese have lost at least 1,200 soldiers in the fighting.
Tuesday, September 15th - October 7th, 1942

The Japanese begin building up their forces to reclaim Henderson Field.
Sunday, September 22nd, 1940

Japanese forces enter French Indochina now being governed by French Vichy.
Saturday, September 26th, 1942

Despite gains along the Kokoda Trail, the Japanese supply line begins to run thin and halt any further advance.
Saturday, September 26th, 1942

Australian Army forces hold fast to territory near Toribaiwa.
Saturday, September 26th, 1942

The Japanese Army slowly begins to retreat back through the Kokoda Trail, finally realizing its perilous stuation.
Friday, September 27th, 1940

The Axis powers of Germany, Italy, and Japan strengthen their ties through the Tripartite Act which makes an enemy of an ally an enemy to all.
Sunday, September 2nd, 1945

The formal Japanese surrender takes place on the deck of the American battleship USS Missouri. Japanese leaders sign the surrender in front of American General Douglas MacArthur. The end of World War 2 - with VJ day - has arrived.
Friday, September 4th, 1942

With the Allied resistance holding off further advance, the Japanese Army begins a formal withdrawal of the island.
Friday, September 4th, 1942

Japanese casualties at Milne Bay amount to 1,000 killed amidst the fighting.
Monday, September 7th, 1942

US Marines enact a surprise amphibious landing against Japanese strongholds at Taivu.
Tuesday, September 8th, 1942

The US Marine landings result in the destruction of vital Japanese supplies and the recovery of important operational data.